TME > Audio > Incidental Music > 50th Anniversary > Limited Edition

Doctor Who - The 50th Anniversary Collection

This annotated track listing is accurate for all the material available on the four-disc and two-disc sets, though is just speculative for music exclusive to the eleven-disc set. We will confirm and update the notes when the full album is released later in 2014. Follow @TME1998 for updates.

Disc Three: The Third Doctor – Jon Pertwee (1970 - 1974)



78 minutes' material across 36 tracks. Over 21 minutes' music was previously unreleased. Three minutes of this had been presented on the four-disc set.

25:06 appeared on the 4CD collection, across 12 tracks (32% of the 11CD material).

12:36 appeared on the 2CD collection, across 2 tracks (50% of the 4CD tracks, 16% of the 11CD material).
1.
Doctor Who: Opening Title Theme (1970) (0:46)
Realised by Delia Derbyshire (BBC Radiophonic Workshop)
Likely to be the stutter-start version, first heard on Doctor Who at the BBC Radiophonic Workshop Volume 2: New Beginnings, track 1. TBC.

SPEARHEAD FROM SPACE (1970)
2.
TARDIS tries to take off (0:30)
Previously unreleased.

The serial was scored by Dudley Simpson, who was now the most frequent composer at work on the series. For this impressive colour and film debut, he hired a larger group of musicians than usual, and an eight piece orchestra provided the incidental music.

DOCTOR WHO AND THE SILURIANS (1970) - Music by Carey Blyton
3.
Music from “Doctor Who and the Silurians” (7:34)
Previously unreleased in this format, though three minutes of stereo music from this story had been presented as part of Carey Blyton's Film & Television Music series in 2003 (CD2, tracks 43-47), and the 30-minute score was released on the DVD release in 2008. The disc also included a featurette looking at the story's unconventional incidental music in detail.

In common with many other composers who worked in the commercial field, Carey Blyton used material from his commercial scores in concert works. Selections from his score were re-arranged for Trumpet (or Cornet or Flugelhorn) & Piano in 1993, with sheet music published by AV Music ('Silurian Suite - Op. 102'). A recording of this suite was released on the 1999 CD Sherlock Holmes Meets Dr. Who.

THE AMBASSADORS OF DEATH (1970)
4.
Outer Space (2:05)
Previously unreleased, though the sound effect may have been one of those heard over the DVD Photo Gallery in 2012. TBC.

The story was another scored by Dudley Simpson, who wrote a stirring theme for UNIT that Mark Ayres would later rework and rearrange for 'The UNIT Family' featurettes on the DVD range. Ayres' re-recording also appeared over the Photo Gallery of this story.

INFERNO (1970)
5.
TARDIS Control On & Warp Transfer (0:22)
First heard on Volume 2: New Beginnings, track 2.

6.
Blue Veils and Golden Sands (3:26)
- Music by Delia Derbyshire (BBC Radiophonic Workshop)
7.
The Delian Mode (5:32)
- Music by Delia Derbyshire (BBC Radiophonic Workshop)
These two tracks were first heard on an internal BBC disc of early Radiophonic Workshop music, a compilation that was commercially released in 1971 (as BBC Radiophonic Music). Mark Ayres added them to the first CD reissue of Doctor Who - The Music in 1992 (Earthshock: Classic Music from the BBC Radiophonic Workshop Volume 1, tracks 5 & 12) and remastered versions appeared on Volume 2: New Beginnings, tracks 3-4.

8.
Battle Theme (1:01)
- St George (Standard Music Library ESL 104)
'St George' was a pseudonym used by Brian Hodgson for work done outside of his BBC contract. This track was originally recorded for the Standard Music Library album Electronic Music in 1969, and was first commercially released as part of The Tomorrow People (Original Television Music) in 2006, track 3. The original LP gave each track a short library description as to their nature; 'Battle Theme' was described as: “Heavy industrial, non-melodic.”

No incidental music was composed for Inferno, with the only backing music coming from stock tracks; it was the last story to do so.

THE MIND OF EVIL (1971) - Music by Dudley Simpson
9.
The Master’s Theme (0:43)
Producer Barry Letts asked that all the incidental music for Season Eight be composed by Dudley Simpson and produced electronically by Brian Hodgson, as it was an attractively cheaper option than using session musicians and recording studios. The pair made extensive use of the Radiophonic Workshop's new VCR 3 synthesiser at Maida Vale, and Simpson was especially pleased with his 'Master's Theme', which first appeared in Terror of the Autons (1971) and made regular reappearances along with the character up until Frontier in Space (1973). (The next producer, Philip Hinchcliffe, forbade Simpson from using it when the Master re-appeared in The Deadly Assassin in 1976). This version of the theme was first released on Volume 2: New Beginnings, track 5, and came from Episode 2, about 9:25 in.

10.
Hypnosis Music (0:36)
Previously unreleased.

11.
Dover Castle (0:29)
This cue (from Episode 5, around 17:07) was first made available on flexi disc in 1972, Sounds from.... EMS, titled 'Doctor Who'. The record promoted the independent company created by Brian Hodgson and Delia Derbyshire, being intended as a sampler for their synthesiser sounds, and an EP of the same name was later commercially released (with the title of this track changed to 'Dover Castle', actually a reference to the filming location rather than the fictional setting of Stangmore Prison). The cue was remastered for CD on Volume 2: New Beginnings, track 6.

12.
Keller Machine Appears and Vanishes (0:22)*
* Special Sound by Brian Hodgson (BBC Radiophonic Workshop)
This sound effect was first released on The Mind of Evil VHS in 1998, playing over the credit cards for the bonus colour footage. It was later released on Volume 2: New Beginnings, track 7.

13.
Keller Machine Theme (0:42)
Realised by Brian Hodgson (BBC Radiophonic Workshop)
This cue was first released (as 'Minds of Evil') on Radiophonic Workshop - 21 in 1979 and was remastered for CD on Volume 2: New Beginnings, track 8. It scored the Episode 3 cliff-hanger and Episode 4 reprise.

The above tracks appear to be all that survive from the 28-minute score to this story, as no further music has been released. 'The Master's Theme' and 'Keller Machine Theme' were re-recorded with conventional instruments by Simpson and Dick Mills as part of 'The World of Doctor Who' suite, released on the B-side to Dudley Simpson's Moonbase 3 theme in 1973. This was also available on the LP Music from BBC Children's Programmes in 1975, and was first mastered for CD on Earthshock: Classic Music... Volume 1, track 4, in 1992. In the suite, jungle sound effects from Planet of the Daleks were backed by a new composition for electric guitar and synthesiser, segueing into stereo versions of The Mind of Evil tracks. Perhaps the original cues were kept as reference material for the suite, and hence survived to this day?

THE CLAWS OF AXOS (1971) - Music by Dudley Simpson
14.
Axos Cell Interior Atmosphere (0:50)*
Previously unreleased, though the DVD Photo Galleries in 2005 and 2012 may have featured this background sound. TBC.

15.
Brain Centre Atmosphere (0:16)*
A longer version of this effect, running to 21 seconds, first appeared on Volume 2: New Beginnings, track 9.

16.
Copy Machine Tickover (0:16)*
A new sound effect, previously unreleased. (It was not included on the DVD Photo Galleries in 2005 and 2012, though many other effects from the story were.) It was first released on the four-disc set.

17.
The Axons Approach (1:45)
First released (with the name 'Axos Attack!') on the promotional flexi disc Sounds from... EMS, along with 'Dover Castle' (see above). The cue faded out after one minute on flexi disc, but the alternative EP version featured the full-length track. 47 minutes' music was composed for this serial, though this is the only track to have survived, coming from Episode 3 around 13:54. It was first remastered for CD on Volume 2: New Beginnings, track 10.

18.
TARDIS Lands (0:22)*
* Special Sound by Brian Hodgson (BBC Radiophonic Workshop)
This version of the TARDIS landing effect was first released on the 1976 LP Out of This World and was remastered on Volume 2: New Beginnings, track 11.

THE CURSE OF PELADON (1972)
19.
TARDIS Interior (Stationary) (0:56)
20.
TARDIS Interior (In flight) (0:54)
These sound effects were first released on Doctor Who - Sound Effects, side 2 tracks 8-9, with the 'In flight' version running longer at 1:43. The album (originally No. 19 in the long-running series of BBC Sound Effect LPs) was re-issued on limited edition blue vinyl for Record Store Day 2012, and presented on CD in the same year as part of the Vintage Beeb range. This was the first time that these two sounds had been credited to a particular story.

THE SEA DEVILS (1972) - Music by Malcolm Clarke (BBC Radiophonic Workshop)
21.
Music from “The Sea Devils” (5:24)
With the budget for this serial mainly allocated to location shooting and action, one area where savings could be made was by employing an 'in house' musician. Instead of hiring Dudley Simpson and his musicians, director Michael Briant decided to explore the use of a synthesised soundtrack from the Radiophonic Workshop - the first for many years. The commission was first given to John Baker, who fell ill (apparently before starting work).

This evocative stereo suite was first prepared for Doctor Who - The Music in 1983, side 1 track 2, and it was also released as a US B-side to Jon Pertwee's Who Is The Doctor in 1983. The suite was first mastered for CD as part of Earthshock: Classic Music... Volume 1 in 1992, track 2. 44 minutes' of Clarke's soundtrack was later released on Volume 2: New Beginnings tracks 13-37, treated with a pseudo-stereo effect, and the complete mono score (running to 56 minutes) was made available on DVD in 2008.

While preparing Volume 2: New Beginnings in 2000, Ayres examined the Sea Devils suite and found it to contain the following cues:
    1m1 (start)
    1m3
    1m4 (start missing)
    1m8
    1m2
    2m5a (with some additional overdubs - probably taken from the music's reuse as part of Malcolm Clarke's August 2026 (There Will Come Soft Rains) in 1976)
    2m5b
    2m9 (just the double “sting” from the middle of this cue)
    Sea Devils' Base Atmosphere (by Brian Hodgson)
    3m14
    3m16

THE MUTANTS (1972) - Music by Tristram Cary
22.
Transfer Machine Arrival (0:17)*
Previously unreleased.

23.
Music from “The Mutants” (7:12)
Electronic Music Composed and Realised by Tristram Cary
* Special Sound by Brian Hodgson (BBC Radiophonic Workshop)
Since his last work for the series, Cary had developed his own studio for electronic music and used his state-of-the-art equipment to provide atmospheric incidental scores on episodes of Late Night Horror and Out of the Unknown. As with the first Dalek serial, the music recorded by Cary was electronic and comprised a total of around 62 minutes across the six episodes.

In 2003, Cary produced a stereo mix of the entire score for release on Devils' Planets (CD2 tracks 7-45). This new seven-minute suite compiled the following cues from the CD:
    II (1:04)
    XXVI (0:48)
    III (1:02)
    VII (1:01)
    XV (1:17)
    XXV (2:35)
The segues meant that the suite ran 39 seconds shorter than the same individual tracks, but, apart from a few overlapping starts/ends, the cues were otherwise presented in full.

24.
Doctor Who [Stereo version 1972] (2:23)
Realised by Delia Derbyshire (BBC Radiophonic Workshop
Prepared for a 7" single released in April 1973, b/w Reg by Paddy Kingsland. The original mono theme (on this collection as Disc One, track 1) was given a stereo effect; the “scream” from the 1970 closing titles was added to the front; and the TARDIS take-off effect was mixed into the middle. It first appeared on CD as track 1 of The 25th Anniversary Album (mistitled 'TARDIS - Doctor Who'), and was remastered on Volume 2: New Beginnings, track 38.

This version of the theme was widely heard as 'TARDIS - Doctor Who', with the TARDIS landing effect added to the start. This first appeared on Doctor Who - The Music, side 1 track 1, and was mastered by Ayres for Earthshock: Classic Music... Volume 1, track 1.

25.
Doctor Who [Delaware version 1972] (2:10)
Realised by Delia Derbyshire and Brian Hodgson with Paddy Kingsland (BBC Radiophonic Workshop)
This arrangement was intended for use in Season Ten, though ultimately it was decided to retain the original theme. The only time this theme was heard on UK television was during a trailer for The Three Doctors, but Australians heard the theme on episodes of Carnival of Monsters and Frontier in Space that were sent to the broadcaster by mistake. A version was ultimately presented on The Pertwee Years VHS in 1991, and the VHS and DVD releases of the above two stories presented the alternative theme as a novelty bonus.

The full-length theme was believed to be lost from the Radiophonic Workshop archives when 30 Years was compiled, with only a low-quality cassette copy available (track 33). The original tape resurfaced in time for Volume 2: New Beginnings, track 39.

THE THREE DOCTORS (1973)
26.
Time Lords Background (1:20)
Previously unreleased, though the sound effect may have been among those included on the DVD Photo Gallery in 2003 and 2012; TBC.

CARNIVAL OF MONSTERS (1973) – Music by Dudley Simpson
27.
Music from “Carnival of Monsters” Episode 1 (3:35)
Dudley Simpson provided around 20 minutes of music for this story, mixing synthesised sounds from the Radiophonic Workshop with a conventional underscore, in common with his other scores for Seasons Nine and Ten. Ayres told Radio Free Skaro that the music tape for this episode had been found in Delia Derbyshire's attic, as part of the archive discovered after her death, and was, in fact, the original session recording, pre-synth overdubs; it was therefore different to the music heard in the finished programme. Some cues from the same tape were first released on the Revisited DVD Photo Gallery in 2011, with 1:25 of music mixed with sound effects from the story.

Carnival of Monsters was the final serial for which the sound effects were provided by Brian Hodgson - the only member of the original production team from 1963 still working on the show.

FRONTIER IN SPACE (1972) – Music by Dudley Simpson
28.
Frontier in Space - Hyperspace Jump (0:27)*
* Special Sounds by Dick Mills (BBC Radiophonic Workshop)
For Frontier in Space Dick Mills of the Radiophonic Workshop fully took over the task of producing the sound effects for Doctor Who from Brian Hodgson. This effect was previously unreleased on CD, though it may have been among the sounds heard on the DVD Photo Gallery in 2009. TBC.

29.
Music from “Frontier In Space” Episodes 1 and 2 (5:37)
Simpson composed 48 minutes of music for this serial, and the four-disc set showcased a short suite of music from Episode 1, covering the sequence of the TARDIS materialising on board the spaceship. This material had never been released before, and the extended version on the eleven-disc set offered further new material.

DEATH TO THE DALEKS (1974) – Music by Carey Blyton
30.
TARDIS Malfunctions (sequence) (2:00)*
31.
Exxilon City Beacon (0:54)
* Special Sound by Dick Mills (BBC Radiophonic Workshop)
Both effects were previously unreleased in this format, though 'Exillon City Beacon' featured on the DVD special features in 2012.

32.
Music from “Death to the Daleks” (Extended Suite) (10:25)
Performed by London Saxophone Quartet
Voice - Mostyn Evans
The music to this story was intended to emphasise the Daleks' loss of power, with director Michael Briant electing to use an acoustic style of music different to the electronic mixes favoured by Dudley Simpson. It was composed by Carey Blyton and recorded over two sessions, with Blyton conducting four saxophonists and a percussionist.

Selections from the score were re-arranged for Saxophone Quartet in 1993, with sheet music published by AV Music ('Dalek Suite - Op. 103'), and a recording of this suite released on the 1999 CD Sherlock Holmes Meets Dr. Who. 6:52 from the original soundtrack was then released as part of Blyton's Film & Television Music series in 2003 (CD2 tracks 29-35), and several of those sections were included here: 'A Desolate Landscape' (1:30) and 'Exxilon Chant' (1:02), the latter featuring Welsh tenor Mostyn Evans' solo voice (which Dick Mills was able to transform, by means of multiple recordings and superimposition, into a whole “choir”). The complete 22-minute mono score was presented as an isolated soundtrack on DVD in 2012.

The sheet music included the lyrics to the 'Exxilon Chant':

1.
Ex surge quare obdormis shuba?
Ex surge et ne repellas finem:
Quare faciem tu am avertis,
Oblivisceris tribulationem nostram.

2.
Admae sit in terra venter noster:
Ex surge shuba adjuvanosti.
Shuba auribus nostris audivimus
Patres nostri annunti averunt nobis.

Ayluja! Ayluja!

THE MONSTER OF PELADON (1974)
33.
Aggedor's Temple Atmosphere, Peladon (1:37)
Special Sound by Dick Mills (BBC Radiophonic Workshop)
A short version of this track had appeared on Volume 2: New Beginnings, track 40, running to 59 seconds and segued into the following track ('Metebelis III Atmosphere').

PLANET OF THE SPIDERS (1974) – Music by Dudley Simpson
34.
Music from “Planet of the Spiders” Part 2 (2:44)
Two minutes' music from the same episode had been featured on the DVD Photo Gallery in 2011, though the remainder was previously unreleased. Dudley Simpson's complete score ran to 32 minutes and was recorded by five musicians, with percussionist Tristram Fry providing some South American instruments in order to create a rattling sound for the spiders.

The Programme as Broadcast paperwork suggests that over ten minutes' music was used in this episode, and Andrew Pixley's Archive for Doctor Who Magazine in 2002 reported that the music for the entire serial was recorded over just two sessions, so it is possible that more music exists from this episode and story.

35.
Metabelis III Atmosphere (1:53)
Special Sound by Dick Mills (BBC Radiophonic Workshop)
This ambient track had first been released on Doctor Who Sound Effects in 1978, side 1 track 3, running to over three minutes. It was remastered for CD, and reduced to this length, for Volume 2: New Beginnings, track 41, where it had originally segued into/out of its neighbouring tracks ('Aggedor's Temple Atmosphere' and 'Nerva Beacon Infrastructure' respectively): the version here faded in and out from silence.

36.
Doctor Who Closing Title Theme (1970) (1:14) - Realised by Delia Derbyshire (BBC Radiophonic Workshop)
First released on Volume 2: New Beginnings, track 12.

Disc Four: The Fourth Doctor – Tom Baker (1974 - 1981)



78 minutes' material across 37 tracks. 36 minutes' music was previously unreleased. 16 minutes of this had been presented on the four-disc set.

41:03 appeared on the 4CD collection, across 19 tracks (52% of the 11CD material).

20:06 appeared on the 2CD collection, across 5 tracks (48% of the 4CD tracks, 22% of the 11CD material).
1.
Doctor Who Opening Title Theme (0:44)
Realised by Delia Derbyshire (BBC Radiophonic Workshop)
The 1970 opening titles, with the long version of the repeat-to-fade ending, was first released in pseudo-stereo on 30 Years track 14, titled 'Signature Tune - A New Beginning' (wrongly attributed to the Second Doctor, a mistake repeated on Music from Tomb of the Cybermen). As remastered by Ayres, a short version appeared on the Geoffrey Burgon soundtrack, Terror of the Zygons/The Seeds of Doom (faded out at 33 seconds, and treated with a stereo effect) and a longer version, with a stutter-start, was heard on Volume 2: New Beginnings (45 seconds). This was the first release of the clean-start, full-length, mono version of Ayres' new master.

ROBOT (1974)
2.
Mysterious Robots (1:15)
Previously unreleased. We expect this is a sound effect, possibly one that was featured on the DVD Photo Gallery in 2007. TBC.

THE ARK IN SPACE (1975)
3.
Nerva Beacon Infrastructure and T-Mat Couch (1:42)
Special Sound by Dick Mills (BBC Radiophonic Workshop)
A version of these effects had appeared on 30 Years, track 37 (as 'Wirrn in the Infrastructure', 1:05). This edit was first heard on Volume 2: New Beginnings, track 42, where it segued out of/into the preceding and following tracks ('Metebelis III Atmosphere' and 'The Planet Karn' respectively). Here, it faded in and out from silence.

The incidental music for this story had been composed and conducted by Dudley Simpson, with electronic enhancements by Dick Mills at the Radiophonic Workshop. Although no tapes survive for this, or any of their Season Twelve episodes, in 1993 Silva Screen released an album of Simpson's music recreated on keyboards and vintage synthesisers by Doctor Who fan, Heathcliffe Blair. Tracks were presented from The Ark in Space, Genesis of the Daleks, Planet of Evil, Pyramids of Mars and The Brain of Morbius, and a selection of these tracks included on the compilation The Worlds of Doctor Who in 1994.

THE SONTARAN EXPERIMENT (1975)
4.
Styre's Scouting Machine (1:14)
Special Sound by Dick Mills (BBC Radiophonic Workshop)
First heard on Doctor Who - Sound Effects, side 1 track 4, with the subtitle '(Approach, Stop, Search, Depart)'.

REVENGE OF THE CYBERMEN (1975) – Music by Carey Blyton
5.
Music from “Revenge of the Cybermen” (Extended Suite) (6:54)
Performed by Carey Blyton and Orchestra
For this serial director Michael Briant hired Carey Blyton, who had scored Death to the Daleks for him the previous year, and once again Blyton chose a selection of unusual instruments for his 31-minute score. However, producer Philip Hinchcliffe felt that Blyton's music was unsuitably comical, and had Peter Howell of the Radiophonic Workshop add a minute of electronic music to Part Two and almost five minutes to Part Three. None of Howell's music appeared in the shorter, four-disc version of this suite, and there have been indications that it does not survive - such as the absence of an isolated music track on the DVD, the only one of Blyton's scores to be unreleased in this format.

Selections from the score were re-arranged for Horn (or Saxhorn) & Piano in 1993, with sheet music published by AV Music ('Vogan Suite - Op. 101'), and a recording of this suite released on the 1999 CD Sherlock Holmes Meets Dr. Who. Four minutes from the original soundtrack were featured on Carey Blyton's Film & Television Music series in 2003 (CD2, tracks 23-28), and some material was duplicated here: 'Cybermen!' (0:39) and 'Cybermen and Vogans fight in the underground caves: the Cybermen triumph' (excerpt, 15 seconds), both playing at a slower speed and pitch (over 2% slower than the Blyton CD).

TERROR OF THE ZYGONS (1975) – Music by Geoffrey Burgon
6.
The Destruction of Charlie Rig (0:41)
7.
A Landing in Scotland (1:22)
8.
The Zygons Attack (0:51)
9.
Monster on the Moor (3:27)
As on previous occasions, director Douglas Camfield refrained from hiring regular composer Dudley Simpson, and instead went for a score composed by Geoffrey Burgon. It was performed by five musicians with electronic enhancements added later at the Radiophonic Workshop.

30 minutes of pseudo-stereo music from this story had been released on Ayres' Terror of the Zygons/The Seeds of Doom release in 2000, where these cues had appeared as tracks 2, 3, 6 & 11. They included some unused material - the end of 'The Destruction of Charlie Rig' and the start of 'A Landing in Scotland' were both cut from the programme, though they did appear in the 2013 'Directors' Cut' of Part One on DVD. The complete mono score (running to 38 minutes) was released as an isolated soundtrack on the same DVD, with a pseudo-stereo version of the complete score featured on the 5.1 mix of the story.

THE ANDROID INVASION (1975) – Music by Dudley Simpson
10.
Music from “The Android Invasion” Parts 3 & 4 (Extended Suite) (9:04)
In total around 22 minutes of music had been composed for this serial, with Dudley Simpson conducting the five musicians involved across two recording sessions: one for Parts One and Two, and another for Three and Four, highlights from which are presented here. Approximately three minutes of music from the same two episodes had been included on the DVD Photo Gallery in 2012, mostly mixed with sound effects, and about half of this music was included in the shorter, four-disc edit of the suite.

THE BRAIN OF MORBIUS (1975)
11.
The Planet Karn (1:48)
Special Sound by Dick Mills (BBC Radiophonic Workshop)
First heard on Volume 2: New Beginnings, track 43, where it segued out of/into the preceding and following tracks ('Nerva Beacon Infrastructure & T-Mat Couch' and 'The Shrine of the Sisterhood of Karn' respectively). The track as it appeared here was longer by three seconds at the start, and four seconds at the end, allowing for a slow fade in/out.

Dudley Simpson was particularly pleased with his music from Season Thirteen, citing Pyramids of Mars as one of his favourite scores; when the Television and Film School asked him to give a lecture, he arranged to have an undubbed version of The Brain of Morbius made available to demonstrate his work.

THE SEEDS OF DOOM (1976) – Music by Geoffrey Burgon
12.
Antarctica: The First Pod (2:17)
13.
Harrison Chase (0:40)
14.
The Hymn of the Plants (0:49)
15.
Get Dunbar! / Krynoid on the Loose (2:54)
As with Terror of the Zygons, director Douglas Camfield hired composer Geoffrey Burgon for this story in preference to Dudley Simpson. Burgon contributed around 55 minutes' of music for this, his second and final Doctor Who, of which 46 minutes were released on the Terror of the Zygons/The Seeds of Doom CD with a subtle stereo effect. These tracks had appeared as tracks 19, 21, 30 & 36, with 'The Hymn of the Plants' sharing a track with a cue entitled 'Floriana Requiem'. The complete 64-minute mono score was released as an isolated soundtrack on the DVD in 2010.

Dudley Simpson composed all the programme's incidental music for the next four years (Seasons Fourteen, Fifteen, Sixteen and Seventeen), turning down other work to ensure that he was free for the series. Very few of the tapes from these sessions are known to have survived, and the 50th Collection presents suites from what we might presume to be the only existing recordings.

THE MASQUE OF MANDRAGORA (1976)
16.
The Mandragora Helix (1:26)
Special Sound by Dick Mills (BBC Radiophonic Workshop)
A version of this effect (titled 'Void') had first appeared on 30 Years track 38, where it ran to 1:11 and was treated with a stereo effect. The original mono version later appeared on Volume 2: New Beginnings track 45, though it only ran to 46 seconds and segued out of/into the preceding and following tracks ('Kraal Disorientation Chamber' and 'Atomic Reactor Runs Wild' respectively). The version here was longer by six seconds at the start and 34 at the end, and faded in/out from silence.

THE INVISIBLE ENEMY (1977)
17.
Inside the Doctor's Mind (1:52)
Special Sound by Dick Mills (BBC Radiophonic Workshop)
A short version appeared on Doctor Who - Sound Effects, side 2 track 8 (as 'Inside Dr. Who´s Mind', 1:15).

THE SUN MAKERS (1977) – Music by Dudley Simpson
18.
Music from “The Sun Makers” (11:22)
Previously unreleased. Simpson's complete score ran to 25 minutes and was recorded by six musicians, including Tristram Fry on percussion, who notably struck railway tracks for scenes where Leela entered the 'steamer'. Leslie Pearson played the organ, which he had done on numerous Simpson scores previously; he and Simpson would often record on the organ at St. Gabriel's Church in Cricklewood, with some stories (such as The Deadly Assassin, 1976) featuring solo cues for this impressive instrument. Ayres confirmed to Radio Free Skaro that the entire score survives.

THE INVASION OF TIME (1978) – Music by Dudley Simpson
19.
Music from “The Invasion of Time” Episodes 3 and 4 (5:36)
Highlights from these episodes, presented in chronological story-order. As with The War Games and The Deadly Assassin, Simpson made use of organ music in association with the Time Lords; and the theme that Simpson had originated in Season Twelve for Tom Baker's Doctor (recorded by Heathcliff Blair for the Pyramids of Mars CD) was used for scenes in Part Five.

2:12 originated from Part Three, accounting for around 60% of the total music composed for that episode. The omissions were: the first cue (which would have been the Part Two cliff-hanger repeated, and so perhaps does not exist); and five cues from throughout the episode, which ran to around 1:30 in total.

3:24 originated from the second-half of Part Four, accounting for around 50% of the total music composed. A total of ten cues were absent, running to approximately 3:15 in total... though the suite did include the distinctive cliff-hanger music to Part Four, which introduced the Sontarans in a dramatic surprise reveal! As with The Android Invasion suite, it's likely that the music for these two episodes was recorded in one session, and hence survives when the scores for Parts One, Two, Five and Six do not.

DESTINY OF THE DALEKS (1979)
20.
Movellan Runs Down (2:01)
Previously unreleased.

21.
Nova Device Countdown and Explosion (0:28)
Special Sound by Dick Mills (BBC Radiophonic Workshop)
A short version had been released on Volume 2: New Beginnings, track 46 (0:12).

No music tapes from Season Seventeen have been found, though a memorable excerpt from Dudley Simpson's City of Death score was arranged by Mark Ayres and Ben Foster for inclusion in the 2013 Doctor Who Prom and 2014 Symphonic Spectacular tour.

NIGHTMARE OF EDEN (1979)
22.
Pretty Planet (0:33)
Special Sound by Dick Mills (BBC Radiophonic Workshop)
Previously unreleased, though the effect may have been featured on the DVD Photo Gallery in 2012; TBC. The jungle sound effects for the story used stock sounds dating back to Mission to the Unknown.

23.
Doctor Who Closing Titles (40" Version) (0:41)
Realised by Delia Derbyshire (BBC Radiophonic Workshop)
First heard on Volume 1: The Early Years, track 76. This short edit of the theme was not actually used on television during the fourth Doctor's era; its only contemporary use was on the Genesis of the Daleks LP in 1979.

The final story of Season Seventeen, Shada, was abandoned due to industrial action at the BBC. Dudley Simpson had already started composing music for the serial, though it would be over thirteen years before the story was ready for music, for a special version assembled for BBC Video. Seventh Doctor composer Keff McCulloch composed a new score, sampling conventional instruments in a bid to create a Simpson-style score, and five minutes of his music was featured on the DVD Photo Gallery in 2013.

24.
Doctor Who 1980 (Opening Titles) (0:36)
Realised by Peter Howell (BBC Radiophonic Workshop)
For Season Eighteen the Radiophonic Workshop was asked to provide modern electronic music for the entire series, replacing Dudley Simpson and his conventional instruments. Their new interpretation of the title music was first released on Doctor Who at the BBC Radiophonic Workshop Volume 3: The Leisure Hive in 2002, though the full-length version of the theme had been available as a 7" single since 1980.

THE LEISURE HIVE (1980) - Music by Peter Howell (BBC Radiophonic Workshop)
25.
Into Argolis (1:44)
This track had first appeared on Volume 3: The Leisure Hive, track 3, a disc which presented the complete 50-minute Leisure Hive score with a subtle pseudo-stereo enhancement (tracks 2-19). On that CD, 'Into Argolis' ran for 2:36 and featured a second cue (running to 51 seconds) after the point at which this track cut out. The complete mono score had also been released as an isolated soundtrack on the DVD in 2004, differing only slightly from the CD (where a sound effect had been added during one track), and the same DVD included a 5.1 mix of the story that included a genuine stereo version of the music.

The second half of this cue had been part of 'The Leisure Hive' suite, mixed into stereo, and segued with other music and effects from the story. The suite was first released on BBC Records' Space Invaded LP in 1982, featured on Doctor Who - The Music, side 1 track 9, and was mastered for CD on Earthshock: Classic Music... Volume 1, track 11, in 1992.

26.
Earth Shuttle Arrives (1:21)
First released on Volume 3: The Leisure Hive, track 5, with another cue included on the same track ('His Time Has Come').

MEGLOS (1980) – Music by Paddy Kingsland (BBC Radiophonic Workshop)
27.
The Deons (1:27)
28.
Meglos (1:31)
First released on Doctor Who at the BBC Radiophonic Workshop Volume 4: Meglos and Full Circle, tracks 3 and 12. This album presented 40 minutes from the soundtrack mixed into pseudo-stereo (tracks 2-20), and the complete 50-minute mono score was presented on DVD in 2011.

The cue 'Meglos' was featured in its entirety on Doctor Who - The Music, side 1 track 3, mixed into stereo. The suite opened with a ten-second sound effect, and was first mastered for CD on Earthshock: Classic Music... Volume 1, track 3.

FULL CIRCLE (1980) – Music by Paddy Kingsland (BBC Radiophonic Workshop)
29.
Summons to Gallifrey (1:21)
First released on Volume 4: Meglos and Full Circle, track 21. This was a shorter version, missing a five-second cue from the start of the original CD track. The album had presented 40 minutes from the soundtrack mixed into pseudo-stereo (tracks 21-45); the DVD release in 2009 featured the complete 50 minute mono score.

30.
K9 on a Mission (0:35)
This track was a shorter edit of Volume 4: Meglos and Full Circle, track 30, 'K9 on a Mission/Third Decider', featuring the first and last cues and omitting approximately 44 seconds from the middle of the original track.

Music from State of Decay was not included in this collection. Paddy Kingsland's 49-minute score was featured as an isolated soundtrack on the 2009 DVD.

WARRIORS' GATE (1980) – Music by Peter Howell (BBC Radiophonic Workshop)
31.
Banqueting Music (1:21)
A longer track with the same title appeared on Doctor Who - The Music, side 2 track 4, mixed into stereo and opening/closing with the wind effect from this story. That suite was first mastered for CD on Earthshock: Classic Music... Volume 1, track 16. The version here may be the original cue, as featured on the DVD isolated soundtrack from 2009, which presented the complete 40-minute mono score to the story. TBC.

THE KEEPER OF TRAKEN (1981) – Music by Roger Limb (BBC Radiophonic Workshop)
32.
Nyssa’s Theme (0:41)
33.
Kassia's Wedding Music (0:48)
34.
The Threat of Melkur (0:54)
First heard in stereo on Doctor Who - The Music, side 1, tracks 4-6, and first mastered for CD on Earthshock: Classic Music... Volume 1, tracks 6-8. The complete mono score, running to 33 minutes, had been released as an isolated soundtrack on the DVD in 2007.

LOGOPOLIS (1981) – Music by Paddy Kingsland (BBC Radiophonic Workshop)
35.
TARDIS Interior (Flying, Landing Beep, Stationary, Cloister Bell) (1:29)*
* Special Sound by Dick Mills (BBC Radiophonic Workshop)
This suite of sound effects was previously unreleased, though the flying and stationary effects had first been heard on Doctor Who - Sound Effects (see Disc Three tracks 19-20), and the other effects were included on 30 Years - 'TARDIS Landing Bleep' (track 55, 0:08) and 'Cloister Bell' (track 55, 1:06).

36.
It’s The End... (3:18)
This pseudo-stereo suite brought together the final three cues of Part Four (2:13, 0:39 & 0:32 respectively). The end of the final cue segued into the 1980 Closing Titles (or, on the 2CD edition, the 1980 Full-Length theme).

A CD featuring Paddy Kingsland's music for Logopolis and Castrovalva had been rumoured to be on Silva Screen's list of future projects in the mid-1990s. For a while, Ayres stated that he did not have the Logopolis tapes, but these were evidently located by the time he scored the 1999 Comic Relief sketch, The Curse of Fatal Death, which used some short cues from Logopolis within its soundtrack. The complete mono score been released as an isolated soundtrack on the DVD, and the rumour of a shared soundtrack release for the two stories reappeared when the 2013 Classic Series releases started...

37.
Doctor Who 1980 (Closing Titles) (1:17)
Realised by Peter Howell (BBC Radiophonic Workshop)
First heard as the closing tracks on Volume 3: The Leisure Hive and Volume 4: Meglos and Full Circle in 2002. All its previous appearances on CD started from silence, though here the theme segued from the end of the Logopolis suite.

The Radiophonic Workshop's incidental music for Season Eighteen was considered a success, and they continued to provide all the music for the programme for the next four years (Seasons Nineteen, Twenty, Twenty-One and Twenty-Two)...