TME > Audio > Incidental Music > 50th Anniversary > Limited Edition

Doctor Who - The 50th Anniversary Collection

This annotated track listing is accurate for all the material available on the four-disc and two-disc sets, though is just speculative for music exclusive to the eleven-disc set. We will confirm and update the notes when the full album is released later in 2014. Follow @TME1998 for updates.

Disc Five: The Fifth Doctor – Peter Davison (1982 - 1984)



79 minutes' music across 22 tracks. A suite of music from Black Orchid (3:17) was previously unreleased.

37:53 appeared on the 4CD collection, across nine tracks (48% of the 11CD material).

14:04 appeared on the 2CD collection, across three tracks (37% of the 4CD tracks, 21% of the 11CD material).
CASTROVALVA (1982) - Music by Paddy Kingsland (BBC Radiophonic Workshop)
1.
“The Moment Has Been Prepared For” (1:03)
This music underscored the first pre-titles scene in Doctor Who, one of only five in the Classic Series; two of the others (for Remembrance of the Daleks and the Television Movie) are featured in this collection. 23 minutes of highlights from the Castrovalva score had been released on cassette in 1990 on The Corridor of Eternity, a limited release produced and distributed by the Doctor Who Appreciate Society, with this track included under the title 'Castrovalva (5Z) 1m1'. The complete 40-minute mono score was later released as an isolated soundtrack on the DVD in 2007, with the end of this cue segued into the opening titles.

2.
Doctor Who (1980 - Full Version) (2:42)
Realised by Peter Howell (BBC Radiophonic Workshop)
This was the 7" single version of the theme, first released with a Tom Baker cover in October 1980, then re-issued with Peter Davison and Colin Baker covers in 1982 and 1984 respectively. Each version had 'The Astronauts' by Peter Howell on the B-side. The full-length theme first appeared on CD on The 25th Anniversary Album in 1988 and was newly remastered on Volume 2: New Beginnings, track 49. A brand new stereo remix (featuring extra and extended material) was presented on the Castrovalva DVD in 2007, with a 5.1 remix following on Four to Doomsday in 2008; the same mix was deconstructed and played live by the Radiophonic Workshop at the Roundhouse in 2009, and on tour 2013-14.

CASTROVALVA (1982) - Music by Paddy Kingsland (BBC Radiophonic Workshop)
3.
Castrovalva (Suite) (3:18)
All the music in this new suite (which was given a stereo treatment for the first time) had been included on The Corridor of Eternity, with excerpts from 1m2 (8 seconds), 1m3 (56 seconds), 2m11 (1:20), 4m1 (two excerpts, 30 seconds & 12 seconds) and 1m5 (12 seconds).

FOUR TO DOOMSDAY (1982) - Music by Roger Limb (BBC Radiophonic Workshop)
4.
Exploring the Lab (1:46)
5.
Nyssa is Hypnotised (0:59)
Featuring Special Sound by Dick Mills (BBC Radiophonic Workshop)
These stereo suites of music and sound effects had first been prepared for Doctor Who - The Music, side 1, tracks 7-8 and mastered for CD on Earthshock: Classic Music... Volume 1, tracks 9-10. A suite of music from the story played over the DVD Photo Gallery in 2008, featuring five minutes of unreleased material.

KINDA (1982) - Music by Peter Howell (BBC Radiophonic Workshop)
6.
TSS Machine Attacked (1:03)
Featuring Special Sound by Dick Mills (BBC Radiophonic Workshop)
This stereo version of cue 4m5, featuring music and effects, had first been prepared for Doctor Who - The Music, side 2 track 5, and mastered for CD on Earthshock: Classic Music... Volume 1, track 17. The complete 36-minute mono score was later released on DVD in 2011.

Music from The Visitation (1982) was not included here. Paddy Kingsland's 35-minute score was presented as an isolated soundtrack on DVD in 2004 and 2013, and the composer was interviewed for a special featurette on the same disc.

BLACK ORCHID (1982) - Music by Roger Limb (BBC Radiophonic Workshop)
7.
Black Orchid (3:17)
Previously unreleased, except for a short suite of incidental music featured on the DVD Photo Gallery in 2008. The complete soundtrack only ran for 12 minutes, meaning that 25% of it was released here; much of the soundtrack to the story was provided by 1920s dance records within the narrative itself.

EARTHSHOCK (1982) - Music by Malcolm Clarke (BBC Radiophonic Workshop)
8.
March of the Cybermen (5:13)
Featuring Special Sound by Dick Mills (BBC Radiophonic Workshop)
First prepared in stereo for Doctor Who - The Music, side 2, track 9, and mastered for CD on Earthshock: Classic Music... Volume 1, track 21. Two other tracks from the story were released on these albums: 'Subterranean Caves' (2'35") and 'Requiem' (0'39"). The complete 41-minute mono score had been released as an isolated soundtrack on the DVD in 2003.

Music from Time-Flight (1982) was not included in this collection. Highlights from the 33-minute soundtrack by Roger Limb had been featured on the DVD Photo Gallery in 2007, running close to eight minutes.

ARC OF INFINITY (1983) - Music by Roger Limb (BBC Radiophonic Workshop)
9.
Omega Force Field (1:54)
10.
Ergon Threat (1:03)
11.
The Termination of the Doctor (2:08)
These three stereo tracks were all taken from Doctor Who - The Music, side 2, tracks 1-3, first mastered for CD on Earthshock: Classic Music... Volume 1, tracks 13-15. The complete 40-minute mono score was released on DVD in 2007.

SNAKEDANCE (1983) - Music by Peter Howell
12.
Janissary Band (0:48)
This was a short version of the original 52 second track from Doctor Who - The Music, side 2, track 6, and Earthshock: Classic Music... Volume 1, track 18. The complete 25-minute mono score had been released on DVD in 2011, with excerpts from the long version of this track (over four minutes in total) scattered within the soundtrack.

MAWDRYN UNDEAD (1983) - Music by Paddy Kingsland
13.
Mawdryn Undead (Suite) (4:17)
Paddy Kingsland was working as a freelance musician at this point, though the production paperwork for this story still credits the BBC Radiophonic Workshop. 23-minutes of highlights from the Mawdryn Undead score had been released on cassette in 1990, on The Corridor of Eternity; the complete 50-minute score had also been released as an isolated soundtrack on the DVD in 2009. The first 3:13 of the music in this new suite (which was given a stereo treatment for the first time) could be found on The Corridor of Eternity as follows:
    1m2 (1:13)
    1m6 (excerpt, 17 seconds)
    3m8 (three excerpts: 14 seconds, 31 seconds & 15 seconds)
    3m16 (excerpt, 43 seconds)

Music from Terminus (1983) was not included here. The 2009 DVD featured an isolated soundtrack of Roger Limb's 46-minute score.

ENLIGHTENMENT (1983) - Music by Malcolm Clarke
14.
Enlightenment (7:56)
This stereo suite was first heard on Doctor Who - The Music II side 1 track 3. The album was compiled by Dick Mills and co-ordinated by Alison Taylor, and Mills explained his single suites approach in his sleeve note:
    “Certain liberties have been taken with the arrangement of the music in order to provide a continuous suite from each story, so don't be too surprised if the music doesn't follow strict chronological story order; the aim has been to provide a flavour of each adventure, not a perfect musical reconstruction.”
All tracks from the album were first mastered for CD on The Five Doctors: Classic Music from the BBC Radiophonic Workshop Volume 2 in 1992, with this suite appearing as track 2. The complete mono score was released on DVD in 2009, and was mixed into stereo for the Special Edition of the story on the same release.

THE KING'S DEMONS (1983) - Music by Peter Howell
15.
The King's Demons (5:23)
First released in stereo on Doctor Who - The Music II, side 1 track 2, and first mastered for CD on The Five Doctors: Classic Music... Volume 2, track 3. The complete mono score was included as an isolated soundtrack on the 2010 DVD release.

THE FIVE DOCTORS (1983) - Music by Peter Howell (BBC Radiophonic Workshop)
16.
The Five Doctors (8:44)
This stereo suite had originally been prepared for Doctor Who - The Music II, side 1 track 1, where it ran to 8:43, and was first mastered for CD on The Five Doctors: Classic Music... Volume 2, track 4. A shorter version appeared on the four-disc and two-disc sets.

The complete 27-minute mono score was released as an isolated soundtrack on the DVD in 2008. The Special Edition of the story in 1995 was completely re-scored by Howell, incorporating new material throughout and mixing the entire soundtrack into stereo. The DVD release of this version in 1999 came with a special bonus feature presenting the new score in eight suites. For the re-issue of the DVD in 2008 this was changed into a standard isolated soundtrack.

WARRIORS OF THE DEEP (1984) – Music by Jonathan Gibbs (BBC Radiophonic Workshop)
17.
Warriors of the Deep (3:53)
This stereo suite was first heard on Doctor Who - The Music II, side 2 track 1, and mastered for CD on The Five Doctors: Classic Music... Volume 2, track 5. The complete 44-minute mono score was released as an isolated soundtrack on the 2008 DVD.

THE AWAKENING (1984) – Music by Peter Howell (BBC Radiophonic Workshop)
18.
The Awakening (3:53)
First heard on Doctor Who - The Music II, side 2 track 2, mastered for CD on The Five Doctors: Classic Music... Volume 2, track 6. The complete mono score, running to 13 minutes, was released on DVD in 2011.

FRONTIOS (1984) - Music by Paddy Kingsland (BBC Radiophonic Workshop)
19.
Frontios (Suite) (4:21)
This stereo suite was previously unreleased. The complete mono score had been featured on DVD in 2011, running to 42 minutes.

RESURRECTION OF THE DALEKS (1984) - Music by Malcolm Clarke (BBC Radiophonic Workshop)
20.
Resurrection of the Daleks (5:01)
This stereo suite had first been heard on Doctor Who - The Music II, side 2 track 3, and mastered for CD on The Five Doctors: Classic Music... Volume 2, track 7. The complete 54-minute mono score was later released as an isolated soundtrack on DVD in 2002 and 2011. Malcolm Clarke appeared on Breakfast Time on 15 March 1984, demonstrating music from this serial, and this footage appeared on the DVD.

PLANET OF FIRE (1984) - Music by Peter Howell (BBC Radiophonic Workshop)
21.
Planet of Fire (3:55)
First heard on Doctor Who - The Music II, side 2 track 4, and mastered for CD on The Five Doctors: Classic Music... Volume 2, track 8. The complete mono score was released on DVD in 2010, and was mixed into stereo for the accompanying Special Edition of the story.

THE CAVES OF ANDROZANI (1984) - Music by Roger Limb (BBC Radiophonic Workshop)
22.
The Caves of Androzani (Extended Suite) (6:57)
This was an alternative version of the stereo suite that had first been heard on Doctor Who - The Music II, side 2 track 5, and The Five Doctors: Classic Music... Volume 2, track 9, running to 6:05. Most of the 55-minute mono score had been released as an isolated soundtrack on DVD in 2001 and 2010, and then, with a pseudo-stereo treatment, on CD in 2013.

A shorter track appeared on the four-disc and two-disc sets, broadly the same as the original suite but with extra material from 'Milk of the Queen Bat' and 'Is This Death?' (19 & 21 seconds respectively); 'Next Time It'll Be For Real' was cut (51 seconds); and 'Face Off' was moved to earlier in the suite. There was also a longer version of the final chord, which was not heard on-screen and had never been released before.

Disc Six: The Sixth Doctor – Colin Baker (1984 - 1986)



79 minutes' material across 14 tracks, plus the full-length 1986 theme (on Disc Nine). Approximately 24 minutes' music was previously unreleased. Five minutes of this had been presented on the four-disc set.

33:07 appeared on the 4CD collection, across nine tracks (40% of the 11CD material).

20:46 appeared on the 2CD collection, across two tracks (63% of the 4CD tracks, 25% of the 11CD material).
THE TWIN DILEMMA (1984) – Music by Malcolm Clarke (BBC Radiophonic Workshop)
1.
The Twin Dilemma (Extended Suite) (7:19)
This pseudo-stereo suite was the first release of music from this story on CD, though an eight-minute suite of mono music from this story had appeared over the Photo Gallery on the DVD release in 2009, and around a minute of that material was re-used in the shorter, four-disc version of this suite.

ATTACK OF THE CYBERMEN (1985) – Music by Malcolm Clarke (BBC Radiophonic Workshop)
2.
Attack of the Cybermen (Suite) (8:12)
Previously unreleased on CD, though the complete 52-minute mono score was isolated on DVD in 2009, with some cues from the story mixed into stereo for various special features.

VENGEANCE ON VAROS (1985) – Music by Jonathan Gibbs (BBC Radiophonic Workshop)
3.
Vengeance on Varos (Suite) (6:53)
The first DVD release of the story in 2001 negated to include an isolated soundtrack, with the Restoration Team explaining that the score was unusually short. The original mono soundtrack was included in full when the story was revisited on DVD in 2012, along with a special 5.1 surround sound mix of the incidentals - the first and (to date) only Doctor Who score to be released in its entirety in this format. This stereo suite marked the first appearance of the music on CD.

THE MARK OF THE RANI (1985) – Music by Jonathan Gibbs (BBC Radiophonic Workshop)
4.
The Mark of the Rani (Extended Suite) (6:47)
Unusually for that time, it was decided that the task of producing incidental music should go to a freelance musician as opposed to a composer at the Radiophonic Workshop. John Lewis was the composer given the contract, but shortly after starting work on The Mark of the Rani he was taken ill. Although he had composed 32 minutes of music, this was not used, and the task of creating the score was passed to the Radiophonic Workshop. Lewis's score to Part One was presented as an alternative soundtrack on the DVD release in 2006.

This pseudo-stereo suite was the first release of Jonathan Gibbs' music from this story on CD, though the complete 26-minute mono score had been released on DVD as an isolated soundtrack, with Gibbs interviewed for a special feature on the same disc. A shorter version of this suite appeared on the four-disc and two-disc sets.

THE TWO DOCTORS (1985) - Music by Peter Howell (BBC Radiophonic Workshop)
5.
The Two Doctors (Extended Suite) (6:31)
Guitar - Les Thatcher
This pseudo-stereo suite was the first release of music from this story on CD, though the complete 40-minute mono score had been released as an isolated soundtrack on the DVD in 2003. A shorter version appeared on the four-disc and two-disc sets.

TIMELASH (1985) – Music by Elizabeth Parker (BBC Radiophonic Workshop)
6.
Timelash (Suite) (5:51)
This stereo music suite had first been heard on 30 Years, track 64, one of the few music tracks on that album. The music appeared on the 50th Anniversary Collection at a slightly lower pitch, running around 2% slower, and with the stereo fields swapped around. The final notes originally had a sound effect added overtop, which was removed for this version, shortening the track by six seconds. A different suite of mono music from this story had also appeared over the DVD Photo Gallery in 2007.

REVELATION OF THE DALEKS (1985) – Music by Roger Limb (BBC Radiophonic Workshop)
7.
Revelation of the Daleks (The Funeral Parlour) (2:19)
This track may be sound effects, incidental music by Roger Limb, or some of the background music heard in the funeral parlour, composed by Dick Mills. TBC.

8.
Revelation of the Daleks (3:53)
This pseudo-stereo suite was the first release of music from this story on CD, though the complete 55-minute mono score had been released as an isolated soundtrack on the 2005 DVD; a stereo version of the score was also included on the 5.1 mix of the two episodes. This suite included some unreleased seconds from the very start and end of Part One, which had been segued with the title music on the isolated score.

Inbetween the end of this season and the start of the next, the programme was rested for 18 months; the only Doctor Who produced during this period was the radio drama Slipback (1985), for which Jonathan Gibbs provided 18 minutes of incidental music and Peter Howell's theme arrangement was used for the last time. Music from this series has not been included here, though it is likely to exist.

9.
Doctor Who Theme (1986 - Opening) (0:45)
Arranged and Performed by Dominic Glynn
In early 1985, freelance musician Dominic Glynn had sent producer John Nathan-Turner a demo tape, claiming that he could compose better music than the Radiophonic Workshop. Following further tapes and demos, Glynn was ultimately invited to compose the incidental score for the first four episodes of The Trial of a Time Lord; three days after his commission, Nathan-Turner called again and asked him to rearrange Ron Grainer's original theme - in only five days. This was the first release of this title arrangement on CD, though it had appeared over the clean title sequences on The Trial of a Time Lord DVD in 2008.

THE TRIAL OF A TIME LORD: THE MYSTERIOUS PLANET (1986) – Music by Dominic Glynn
10.
The Mysterious Planet (Extended Suite) (7:39)
Glynn composed about 51 minutes' music for the serial in total, recording in stereo (though the programmes would be mixed and broadcast in mono). The opening organ music was inspired by Holmes' description of the cathedral-like space station, and the tolling bell derived from the TARDIS' Cloister Bell. 22 minutes' music from The Mysterious Planet had first been released on the cassette Black Light in 1988, compiled and distributed by the Doctor Who Appreciation Society's reference department. A six-minute suite of mono music from this story had also appeared over the Photo Gallery on the DVD release in 2008.

Much of the music in the shorter, four-disc and two-disc version of this suite had been on Black Light: featured here were side 1 track 1, 'The Trial Theme' (1:12); and track 9, 'This Could Be The End - Parts 1 & 2' (excerpt, 1:40). The remaining music had all appeared on the Photo Gallery.

An album of rerecorded music, 'Black Light II: The Remixes', was planned to launch the range of Doctor Who soundtracks on the Silva Screen label, but failed to appear. A teaser track was released on flexi disc (a free gift with Doctor Who Magazine in 1991), and this later appeared (extended, and remixed into 5.1) on The Trial of a Time Lord DVD.

THE TRIAL OF A TIME LORD: MINDWARP (1986)
11.
Mindwarp (sound effects montage) (3:59)
(Machine / Sil's Chamber / Test Room background / Light Tunnel Background / Force Beam and TARDIS / Time Bubble / Unfreeze)
A musical score of just over 32 minutes' duration was recorded by freelance composer Richard Hartley (though Malcolm Clarke of the Radiophonic Workshop had originally been intended to score the serial). This was Hartley's only Doctor Who score, and the tapes have been lost - making it the only story after 1980 for which an isolated soundtrack or release is an impossibility.

THE TRIAL OF A TIME LORD: TERROR OF THE VERVOIDS (1986) – Music by Malcolm Clarke (BBC Radiophonic Workshop)
12.
Terror of the Vervoids (Extended Suite) (8:26)
Malcolm Clarke's incidental music ran to about 33 minutes, including around 16 seconds of visual music in Part Nine for the aerobics session. Clarke saw the score as grand and luxurious, fitting in with the “ocean liner” setting. It would be the last Radiophonic Workshop score for Doctor Who on television, though Peter Howell would later write music for The Paradise of Death and The Ghosts of N-Space on radio.

This pseudo-stereo suite was the first release of music from this story on CD, though a six-minute mono suite had appeared over the DVD Photo Gallery in 2008, of which two excerpts (of 32 and 43 seconds) were replicated in the shorter, four-disc version of this suite.

THE TRIAL OF A TIME LORD: THE ULTIMATE FOE (1986) – Music by Dominic Glynn
13.
The Ultimate Foe (Extended Suite) (6:49)
Although originally Malcolm Clarke of the Radiophonic Workshop was to score all of Serial 7C (Terror of the Vervoids/The Ultimate Foe), the final episodes were allocated to Dominic Glynn. He composed around 25 minutes of incidental music for the two instalments, making reference to his own themes from his earlier story (particularly for Glitz). There was much grandiose organ music - echoing the Time Lord atmosphere created by Dudley Simpson in stories such as The War Games and The Deadly Assassin - as well as pipe-organ carnival music for the Fantasy Factory's illuminating debut. To accompany the shots of Peri and King Yrcanos, Glynn rearranged part of Richard Hartley's score for Mindwarp.

13 minutes of music from The Ultimate Foe had first been released on Black Light in 1988. A five-minute suite of mono music from this story had also appeared over the Photo Gallery on the DVD in 2008. Some of the music in this new stereo suite had been on Black Light: on the shorter, four-disc version, featured here were side 1 track 15, 'The Master's Revelation'(1:20); and side 2 track 7, 'Farewell, Doctor' (excerpt, 18 seconds). 45 seconds of the remaining music had been featured (across two incomplete clips) on the DVD Photo Gallery, with the remaining 53 seconds released here for the first time.

14.
Doctor Who Theme (1986 - Closing) (1:20)
Arranged and Performed by Dominic Glynn
Previously released on The Trial of a Time Lord DVD as part of the clean title sequence feature.

Disc Seven: The Seventh Doctor – Sylvester McCoy (1987 - 1989)



79 minutes' music across 22 tracks, plus the full-length 1987 theme (on Disc Nine). Approximately nine minutes' material was previously unreleased, of which one minute had appeared on the four-disc set.

35:22 appeared on the 4CD collection, across ten tracks (43% of the 11CD material).

30:39 appeared on the 2CD collection, across eight tracks (95% of the 4CD tracks, 37% of the 11CD material).
TIME AND THE RANI (1987) – Music by Keff McCulloch
1.
“It's the Man I Want” (0:22)
1m1 (12s) & 1m2 (6s). The incidental music for Time and the Rani was provided by freelancer Keff McCulloch, whom John Nathan-Turner had already contracted to rearrange the title music for Season Twenty-Four. The score had to be completed very quickly, with Part One required in barely a week, and he created a new musical style for the series that would last for the next three years (Seasons Twenty-Four, Twenty-Five and Twenty-Six were exclusively scored by three freelance composers: Glynn, McCulloch and Mark Ayres). Like Dominic Glynn before him, McCulloch recorded his music in stereo, though the programme was still being made in mono at this time.

Several tracks from Time and the Rani had been issued on The 25th Anniversary Album in 1988. Highlights from the score (including some unused and alternate cues) were also distributed by fans during the 1990s, though the source of this bootleg was never clear (Keff McCulloch certainly distributed cassettes of his scores to enquiring fans during the 1980s and 1990s, so we imagine that he personally gave a copy of Time and the Rani to at least one collector). Later, an eight-minute suite of music appeared over the Photo Gallery on the DVD release in 2010.

2.
Doctor Who Theme (1987 - Opening) (2:38)
Arranged and Performed by Keff McCulloch
First released on The 25th Anniversary Album, track 2. It is likely that the opening and closing themes on this disc will be music-only, without Dick Mills' sound effects, unlike the 1980 and 1986 themes where the effects were part of the music; this is certainly how the 1987 titles have been released previously. TBC.

TIME AND THE RANI (1987) – Music by Keff McCulloch
3.
Music from “Time and the Rani” (Extended Suite) (4:02)
Extended from the version on the four-disc and two-disc sets, which included the following cues:
    1m3 (0:19)
    1m5 (0:34)
    1m10 (0:53)
PARADISE TOWERS (1987) – Music by Keff McCulloch
4.
Taken to the Cleaners (1:31)
5.
Drinksmat Dawning (1:28)
6.
The Making of Pex (1:22)
The incidental score for this serial was originally allocated to David Snell, a new composer for the series who had submitted some very atmospheric sample material. The music was delivered and dubbed onto all four episodes, but producer John Nathan-Turner felt that it detracted from the visuals, and requested an emergency replacement score from Keff McCulloch - with the first episode needed in three days. Snell's score, unheard for over twenty years, was presented as an alternative soundtrack on the 2011 DVD.

Six tracks from McCulloch's Paradise Towers, running to 11:40 in total, were released on The 25th Anniversary Album, including 'Drinksmat Dawning' and 'The Making of Pex' (tracks 7 & 16); a further three minutes of material featured on the DVD Photo Gallery. Highlights from the score were privately circulated on cassette during the 1990s.

DELTA AND THE BANNERMEN (1987) – Music by Keff McCulloch
7.
Music from “Delta and the Bannermen” (3:38)
8.
“Here’s to the Future” (featuring The Lorells) (1:56)
'Here's to the Future' was first heard on The 25th Anniversary Album, track 19, along with four other tracks from this story (totalling nine minutes in total). An eight-minute suite of music from this story had also appeared over the Photo Gallery on the DVD release in 2009. This version of the track appeared to come from a different master, running a little faster than earlier releases.

Producer John Nathan-Turner and composer Keff McCulloch had hoped to release a special soundtrack album to accompany this serial, for which numerous 1950s tracks had been re-recorded by McCulloch (along with three session musicians and the Wilson Singers, all of whom appeared on-screen as Billy's backing group, The Lorells). BBC Records rejected this, commissioning The 25th Anniversary Album instead.

DRAGONFIRE (1987) – Music by Dominic Glynn
9.
Music from “Dragonfire” (Extended Suite) (7:11)
17 minutes of music from Dragonfire had first been released on Black Light in 1988, and the complete 26-minute mono score released as an isolated soundtrack on the DVD in 2012. The short, four-disc version of the suite featured:
    1m2 'The Restricted Zone' (0:55)
    1m3 (excerpt, 0:23)
    1m10 'The Sovereign' (slightly edited, 0:55)
    3m10 'Good Fortune, Nosferatu' (0:55)
All this material had also appeared in stereo over the DVD Photo Gallery, with some cues mixed with sound effects. The eleven-disc set featured an extended suite, which ran for an extra 4:09.

REMEMBRANCE OF THE DALEKS (1988) – Music by Keff McCulloch
10.
Music from “Remembrance of the Daleks” (Extended Suite) (8:21)
11.
Time Will Tell (1:00)
This was the first story to be mixed and broadcast in stereo (though only in the London area). Two tracks from this story had been featured on The 25th Anniversary Album in 1988, and the complete 37-minute score had been released as an isolated soundtrack on the DVD in 2001. The shorter, four-disc and two-disc version of this suite featured both of the 25th Anniversary tracks:
    2m8 'Cemetery Chase' (presented here in its shorter, televised version, running to 1:50)
    3m3 (0:20)
    4m7 (0:50)
    4m17 'A Child's Return' (2:32)
'Time Will Tell' was the final cue from the story, and on DVD had segued with the closing titles.

Keff McCulloch was interviewed for The Making of Doctor Who, an American documentary broadcast in November 1988, and memorably deconstructed the sampled drum beats from 'Cemetery Chase'. An edited version of this programme appeared on the VHS of Silver Nemesis in 1993.

THE HAPPINESS PATROL (1988) – Music by Dominic Glynn
12.
Music from “The Happiness Patrol” (7:11)
Dominic Glynn provided just under 29 minutes' music for this three-part story, plus two minutes of 'Muzak'. The harmonica solos were played by Adam Burney, with Glynn writing the music to fit actor Richard D. Sharp's performance, breathing and hand movements. The complete soundtrack was distributed on cassette tape in the 1990s (circulated privately between fans, most likely from a copy obtained from Glynn) and was later presented as an isolated soundtrack on DVD in 2012.

SILVER NEMESIS (1988) – Music by Keff McCulloch
13.
Fourth Reich (1:21)
14.
Landing of the Cybermen (2:47)
15.
Shooting at Us (1:26)
A cassette of Keff McCulloch's 33-minute score, including several alternative and un-used cues, was auctioned at a Doctor Who convention in the late '80s, and copies circulated between fans throughout the 1990s. The complete soundtrack was presented on DVD in 2010.

THE GREATEST SHOW IN THE GALAXY (1988) – Music by Mark Ayres
16.
Music from “The Greatest Show in the Galaxy” (Extended Suite) (7:07)
For some years prior to his first job on the series, composer Mark Ayres had written incidental music for Doctor Who spin-off videos and conventions; like Dominic Glynn before him, he then successfully convinced John Nathan-Turner to hire him on the strength of demo material and a long correspondence. Ayres composed around 84 minutes of music, not all of which was used; his score was released on CD by Silva Screen in 1992, and was issued again as an isolated soundtrack on the DVD in 2012. The shorter, four-disc and two-disc version of this new suite joined the beginning of one track with the end of another:
    3m13 - part of the album track 'The Werewolf/Request Stop' (1:22)
    4m11 - part of the album track 'Playing for Time' (2:01)
The DVD included a special feature, 'The Psychic Circus', a song written by Christopher Guard and performed by cast members Jessica Martin, TP McKenna and Guard himself. Produced by Mark Ayres, the song had originally been pitched as a tie-in single for the story - and received John Nathan-Turner's blessing - and was then expected to appear on the Silva Screen soundtrack release, but remained unreleased until 2012.

BATTLEFIELD (1989) – Music by Keff McCulloch
17.
Music from “Battlefield” (Extended Suite) (5:24)
This was the first release of any of Battlefield's music on CD, though the complete 55-minute score had been released as an isolated soundtrack on the DVD in 2008. A shorter version of this suite appeared on the four-disc set, showcasing the following cues:
    1m14 (0:52)
    2m6 (2:00)
    3m5 (1:52)
GHOST LIGHT (1989) – Music by Mark Ayres
18.
Music from “Ghost Light” (4:32)
The near-complete score had been released on CD in 1993, and was re-issued in full as one of the 50th Anniversary discs in 2013 (including an alternate score for Part One); the music was also presented as an isolated soundtrack on the DVD in 2004. Although a suite of music from the story had been prepared for The Worlds of Doctor Who in 1994, the timings suggest that this was an entirely new suite. TBC.

THE CURSE OF FENRIC (1989) – Music by Mark Ayres
19.
Music from “The Curse of Fenric” (Extended Suite) (7:30)
The complete 68-minute score to this story had been released on CD by Silva Screen in 1991 (including some extra material written for the VHS version), and was issued again as an isolated soundtrack on the DVD in 2003. The shorter, four-disc and two-disc version of this new suite included:
    3m5 'The Battle for St Judes' (excerpt, 2:50)
    4m9 'Kathleen's Escape' (excerpt, 52 seconds)
    2m12 'The Vicar and the Vampires' (excerpt, 1:29)
    4m13 'The Final Battle' (excerpt, 1:27)
This short version of the suite was very similar indeed to the nine-minute suite released on The Worlds of Doctor Who in 1994, with just a few cuts (the first 56 seconds, and 1:22 from the middle). The same excerpts from the first three tracks had also been collected together in the track 'Vampire's Attack!' on the US CD The Best of Doctor Who Volume 2 in 1994.

SURVIVAL (1989) – Music by Dominic Glynn
20.
Music from “Survival” (Extended Suite) (8:25)
21.
“...and somewhere else, the tea’s getting cold” (0:23)
Guitar – David Hardington
This was the first release of any of Survival's music on CD, though the complete 50-minute score had been released as an isolated soundtrack on the DVD in 2007. During the early 2000s a few tracks had also been distributed by fans, though at low quality and from an unknown source. A short version of this suite appeared on the four-disc and two-disc sets.

22.
Doctor Who Theme (1987 - Closing) (1:14)
Arranged and Performed by Keff McCulloch
First released on The 25th Anniversary Album, track 21.

Disc Eight: The Eighth Doctor – Paul McGann (1996)



61 minutes' material across 34 tracks - the entire original score of the Television Movie, including some material not used in the film.

10:41 appeared on the 4CD collection, across six tracks (17% of the 11CD running time - though not all of these tracks were replicated on the eleven-disc set).

7:54 appeared on the 2CD collection, across one track (80% of the 4CD tracks, 13% of the 11CD material - though again not all of these tracks were replicated).
DOCTOR WHO – THE TELEVISION MOVIE (1996) – Music by John Debney
50 minutes from the Television Movie score were first heard on a promotional CD released by John Debney in 1997, which travelled widely and ended up being stocked in many specialist shops in the UK. The promotional CD featured numerous changes to the score, seeming to present early versions of tracks that were later cut or changed for the film.

The M&E track (music and effects, no dialogue – intended for dubbing the film into foreign-languages) and the complete isolated score had been supplied to BBC Worldwide when the film was completed, and these DAT tapes were discovered and archived by Ayres when the DVD was being prepared. The 63-minute score was subsequently released as an isolated soundtrack on DVD in 2001 and 2010, running 4% faster (to match the PAL conversion of the film).

It's interesting to note the change in attitude towards the Television Movie score. In Ayres' 50th Anniversary sleeve notes, he asserts that the entire score was synthesised. Yet for many years it had been reported that the score was recorded by a live orchestra; indeed Doctor Who Magazine claimed as late as 2003 that the score “was recorded on Tuesday 16 and Wednesday 17 April [by] a 60-piece orchestra...”

1.
Prologue: Skaro / “Doctor Who” Theme / The Casket (2:19) – Music by John Sponsler / Ron Grainer arranged by John Debney and John Sponsler
Contains previously unreleased material
According to the book Regeneration, which listed all the musical cues from the film, the individual timings were: 'Skaro' (0:40) (credited to Sponsler), 'Doctor Who Theme' (1:05) (Grainer, arranged Debney 30%, Sponsler 70%) and 'That Should Do It' (0:21) (Debney 30%, Sponsler 70%). Almost all the timings in the book were inaccurate when compared to the isolated soundtrack or the finished film, and John Sponsler's name was mis-printed as 'Sponsier' throughout. (Worse, the film itself mis-credited Louis Febre's name as 'Sebre' during the opening titles.)

The original promotional album offered a different version of these tracks, titled 'Prologue: Skaro/“DOCTOR WHO” Theme', with a notable remix of 'Skaro' (longer, and with more prominent drum beats) and the End Titles version of the theme tune (no repeat, and with a crescendo ending). This short version was released on the four-disc and two-disc 50th Anniversary sets.

2.
Breakout (2:36) – Music by John Sponsler
Break-Out (1:35) (Febre 12.5%, Sponsler 87.5%)
Regeneration credited Febre and Sponsler, though the original album credited just Sponsler. The opening 23 seconds were not used in the film. The end was also cut, from 2:12 onwards, and replaced with other sections from the score (short excerpts from 'The TARDIS' and 'Half Human').

3.
Wimps / Doctor #7 is Shot (1:49) – Music by John Debney & John Sponsler
Contains previously unreleased material
Wimps (1:06) (Sponsler), Doctor Seven Shot (0:55) (Debney 30%, Sponsler 70%), Untitled (0:07)
The last cue had not appeared on the original album and was not listed in Regeneration.

4.
Aftermath (1:04) – Music by John Debney & John Sponsler
Snake (0:53) (Debney 30%, Sponsler 70%)

The isolated soundtrack presented an additional cue after this track; it was listed in Regeneration as 'Two Hearts' (the same title as given to a later cue) composed by Debney 30%, Sponsler 70%, with an erroneous running time of five seconds (it was included on the isolated score with a running time of 19 seconds). This was simply a truncated version of the cue 'Bad Morning', presented on track 13 of this album.

5.
Mr Smith and the Ambulance (1:51) – Music by Louis Febre
Previously unreleased
In The Ambulance (0:28) (Febre)
A section of approximately 13 seconds from the middle of the cue was not heard in the film.

6.
“I Am Not Human” (1:13)
Previously unreleased
This cue was not listed in Regeneration.

7.
Flatline (1:01) – Music by John Sponsler
Previously unreleased
Open Eyes (0:34) (Sponsler)

8.
X-Ray / Snake in the Bathroom (1:37) – Music by John Sponsler / John Debney & John Sponsler
Contains previously unreleased material
No Double Exposure (0:21) (Sponsler), City View (0:15), Snake (0:37) (both Debeny 23%, Febre 24%, Sponsler 53%)
'City View' was not used in the film. The last track was retitled for the original album as 'Snake in the Bathroom', though this should have been 'Bedroom'. Regeneration credited all three composers, though the original album only Debney and Sponsler.

An extra cue titled 'Stop Him', credited in Regeneration to Debney 23%, Febre 24%, Sponsler 53%, appeared after 'No Double Exposure' in the film and ran to 19 seconds. This cue was made up of elements from other tracks ('Wimps' and 'Half Human'), and appeared on the isolated soundtrack with background effects and ambience, taken from the M&E track.

9.
The Taking of Bruce (1:03) – Music by John Debney & John Sponsler
Previously unreleased
Slams the Door (0:16) and Snake (0:33) (both Debney 30%, Sponsler 70%)

10.
Seven to Eight (2:20) – Music by John Debney & John Sponsler
Previously unreleased
Look Out (0:09), He's Alive (0:23), It's Alive (0:22), In the Morgue (0:30) and No! (0:04) (all Debney 30%, Sponsler 70%)

11.
“Who Am I?” (1:55) – Music by Louis Febre
Walking (1:18) (Debney 30%, Sponsler 70%)
Regeneration credited Febre, whilst the original album credited Debney and Sponsler. The first 30 seconds of this cue were not heard in the film.

12.
City Scape (1:51) – Music by John Debney & John Sponsler
Contains previously unreleased material
Cityscape (1:37) (Debney 30%, Sponsler 70%)
This track was cut-down to 1:08 on the promotional album, where it appeared without the opening piano motif and with the music edited at several points. The full-length version was presented here, as it had been on the isolated soundtrack.

The listings in Regeneration included a credit after this for a four-second cue, 'Pop Goes the Weasel', credited to Trad - arranged Sponsler. This most likely referred to the musical fob-watch that Chang-Lee finds in the Doctor's belongings, and which plays briefly during the 'City Scape' cue.

13.
Bad Morning (0:33) – Music by John Debney & Louis Febre
Previously unreleased
The Master (0:29) (Debney 30%, Febre 70%)
A version of this track was used to replace the unused cue 'City View' earlier in the film.

14.
Time (0:57) – Music by John Debney & Louis Febre
Time (0:51) (Debney 30%, Febre 70%)

15.
“I Quit” (1:01) – Music by John Debney & Louis Febre
Previously unreleased
I Quit (0:54) (Debney 30%, Febre 70%)

16.
Primitive Wiring / The UnBruce (1:43) – Music by Louis Febre / John Debney & Louis Febre
Primitive Wiring (0:53) and The Asian Child (0:34) (both Febre)
Regeneration only credited Febre for both cues, though the original album credited Debney and Febre for the second.

17.
Two Hearts (1:12) – Music by John Debney & Louis Febre
Two Hearts (1:02) (Debney 30%, Febre 70%)

18.
The TARDIS / True Identity (2:15) – Music by John Debney & Louis Febre
The TARDIS (1:02) and True Identity (0:57) (both Debney 30%, Febre 70%)

19.
Night Walk (1:45) – Music by John Debney & Louis Febre
Night Walk (1:27) (Debney 30%, Febre 70%)

20.
The Eye of Harmony / Half Human (4:35) – Music by Louis Febre
The Eye of Harmony (2:39) and Half Human (1:40) (both Febre)

21.
Until Midnight / Atomic Clock (2:01) – Music by Louis Febre
Until Midnight (1:05) and Atomic Clock (0:43) (both Febre)
A typo on the promotional CD had originally named the first cue 'Unil Midnight'.

In the film a 29-second cue appeared after these tracks, simply a series of drum beats. On the isolated score this was presented from the M&E track, mixed with background sound effects. It was not listed in Regeneration.

22.
Green Eyes (0:49) – Music by John Sponsler
Contains previously unreleased material
Ambulance (0:11) and Green Eyes (0:46) (both Sponsler)
The promotional album segued the two cues together, cutting 'Ambulance' down to three seconds; the new version presented both cues back-to-back.

23.
The Chase (3:17) – Music by John Debney & John Sponsler
Contains previously unreleased material
Chase (3:36) (Febre 5%, Debney 29%, Sponsler 66%)
All three composers were credited in Regeneration, though only Debney and Sponsler on the original album. The complete track was presented on the isolated score, though the first 32 seconds (a repeated drum beat) were taken from the M&E track, mixed with background sound effects. Ten seconds towards the end were not heard in the film; a section from the cue 'Beryllium Clock' was used instead.

The original promotional album featured a shortened 2:23 version, with around a minutes' material edited out. This short edit was released on the four-disc and two-disc 50th Anniversary sets, titled 'The Chase (Original Version)'.

24.
Beryllium Clock / Bragg's Key (1:12) – Music by Louis Febre
Two cues, running to 0:29 and 0:45, neither of which were listed in Regeneration. The track title was copied from the promo album, with its misspelling of Professor Wagg. (Loyalty to the original title was consistent with the re-issuing of the erroneously-named 'Dover Castle' on Disc Three.)

25.
Jelly Baby (0:12) – Music by John Debney & Louis Febre
Previously unreleased
Beryllium Clock (0:11) (Debney 30%, Febre 70%)

26.
Slimed (2:06) – Music by John Debney & Louis Febre
Slimed (1:59) (Debney 30%, Febre 70%)
Around eight seconds of this track (from 0:13-0:21) were not used in the film, replaced by a looped section from earlier in the track and an excerpt from 'Half Human'.

27.
Under the Influence (0:47) – Music by Louis Febre
Under the Influence (0:40) (Febre)

28.
Crown of Nails (1:13) – Music by John Debney & John Sponsler
Crown of Nails (1:07) (Debney 30%, Febre 70%)
Where Regeneration credited Debney and Febre, the original album credited Debney and Sponsler.

29.
Lee's Last Chance (2:09) – Music by John Debney & John Sponsler
Lee's Last Chance (1:07) (Debney 30%, Febre 70%)
Where Regeneration credited Debney and Febre, the original album credited Debney and Sponsler. The last 50 seconds of the track were not used in the film.

30.
“Open the Eye” (2:25) – Music by John Debney & John Sponsler
Open the Eye (2:15) (Febre 17.5%, Sponsler 82.5%)
Regeneration credited Sponsler and Febre, though the original album credited Sponsler and Debney.

A section of approx 34 seconds from this track (from 0:39-1:13) was faded out in the film, and replaced with repeated sections from other cues.

31.
“Reroute Power!” / Temporal Orbit (6:17) – Music by John Sponsler / John Debney & John Sponsler
Reroute Power (1:51) (Sponsler) and Temporal Orbit (4:05) (Debney 30%, Febre 70%)
Renegeration credited the second cue to Debney and Febre, while the original album credited Debney and Sponsler. The first three seconds of 'Reroute Power!' were not heard in the film, as they were drowned out by sound effects (in the US version, following an ad break) and mixed with the end of the previous cue (in the UK and DVD versions, where there was no break).

The promotional album cut a few seconds from this cue, removing a single bar of music between 0:17 and 0:21. The full-length version appeared on the isolated soundtrack, but it's not really possible to tell, from the track timing alone, which version has been used on the 50th Anniversary set; we'll confirm when it is released...

32.
To Hold Death Back (1:55) – Music by John Debney & Louis Febre
Contains previously unreleased material
To Hold Back Death (1:42) (Debney 30%, Febre 70%) and Contraption (0:06) (Febre)
'To Hold Back Death' was indeed the correct quote, though it was mistitled on the original album. The second cue had not featured on the promo CD.

An extra cue appeared after this track in the film: a 14-second excerpt from the cue 'Farewell', which appeared on track 33 of this disc. This cue was not listed in Regeneration, and it was taken from the M&E track (featuring background ambiance and effects) for the isolated soundtrack.

An arrangement of the traditional New Year's song, 'Auld Lang Syne', was recorded for the film soundtrack at this point but was not used. It was listed in Regeneration as running for 22 seconds, though the actual duration was around 43, and it made an appearance as a bonus feature on the DVD.

33.
Farewell (1:35) – Music by John Debney & Louis Febre
Farewell (1:18) (Debney 30%, Febre 70%)

34.
End Credits / “Doctor Who” Theme (0:49) – Music by Ron Grainer arranged by John Debney and John Sponsler
Doctor Who Theme (0:40) (Grainer, arranged Debney 30%, Sponsler 70%)

Regeneration listed the final cue of 'Universal Logo!' (0:04) (Jame Horner), which was not included on either album.