TME > Audio

Source Music Discography

We're proud to open a brand new wing of our Doctor Who discography: new for 2006, and especially relevant in the light of the new series, is a guide - not necessarily a complete one, but a definite nod in the right direction - to all that indefinable extra music (call it source music, featured music, popular music or whatever you will) that has helped make Doctor Who what it is: music that the characters can hear and react to, but that is also an essential part of the soundtracks to the shows... and that is out there right now, available to buy!

This section of the discography has been arranged, very deliberately, as a buyer’s guide as well as a reference point - we’re sure we weren’t the only ones who wanted to buy ‘Moonlight Serenade’ immediately after The Empty Child, and for all we know there might be those among you who felt the same about ‘The Devil’s Triangle’ - so wherever possible we have included links to currently-available releases at amazon.co.uk for your purchasing pleasure. For reference and contextual purposes we have also gathered some biographical information about the artists featured here, much of which is freely quoted or adapted from the excellent resources at bbc.co.uk/music; we recommend both these sites if you seek any further information.

Pop Music - genuine contemporary or period music

Gary Glitter
Attack of the Graske
2005
The Piglets
The Sea Devils
1972
Savoy Havana
Black Orchid
1982
Element Four
Bad Wolf
2005
[uncredited]
Revelation of the Daleks
1985
Savoy Orpheans
Black Orchid
1982
Elton John
Love & Monsters
2006
King Crimson
The Mind of Evil
1971
Savoy Orpheans
Black Orchid
1982
Electric Light Orchestra
Love & Monsters
2006
The Streets
Father's Day
2005
The Beatles
Remembrance of the Daleks
1988
The Jimi Hendrix Experience
Revelation of the Daleks
1985
Savoy Orpheans
Black Orchid
1982
Irving Berlin
Black Orchid
1982
The Surfers
Revelation of the Daleks
1985
Ian Drury and the Blockheads
Tooth and Claw
2006
[uncredited]
Revelation of the Daleks
1985
The Ted Heath Orchestra
Revelation of the Daleks
1985
Glenn Miller
The Doctor Dances
2005
Irving Berlin
Black Orchid
1982
Tight Fit
Rise of the Cybermen
2006
[Deben Bhattacharya]
Planet of the Spiders
1974
The Mudlarks
Remembrance of the Daleks
1988
Joy Division
School Reunion
2006
Slade
The Christmas Invasion
2005
The Ted Heath Orchestra
Revelation of the Daleks
1985
Glenn Miller
The Empty Child/The Doctor Dances
2005
Electric Light Orchestra
Love & Monsters
2006
The Communards
Father's Day
2005
Rick Astley
Father's Day
2005
The Seekers
The Evil of the Daleks
1967
Fleetwood Mac
Spearhead from Space
1970
The Beatles
The Evil of the Daleks
1967
Brenda Lee
Attack of the Graske
2005
Savoy Havana
Black Orchid
1982
David Bowie
Aliens of London
2005
Soft Cell
The End of the World
2005
The Beatles
Remembrance of the Daleks
1988
Henry Hall
The Invasion
1968
The Beatles
The Chase
1965
Britney Spears
The End of the World
2005
Electric Light Orchestra
Love & Monsters
2006
Il Divo
Love & Monsters
2006
Savoy Orpheans
Black Orchid
1982
Procol Harum
Revelation of the Daleks
1985

Classical Music - genuine orchestra music by the great composers

Maurice Ravel
The Impossible Planet
2006
Debussy
The Robots of Death
1977
Hector Berlioz
The Daemons
1971
Bartók
The Enemy of the World
1967-8
Bartók
The Enemy of the World/Web of Fear
1967-8
Nevin
Greatest Show in the Galaxy
1988
Tchaikovsky
The Robots of Death
1977
Faure
The Curse of Fenric
1989
Wagner
Silver Nemesis
1988
Anton Bruckner
The Mind Robber
1968
Schubert
Logopolis
1981
Puccini
Doctor Who
1996
Lincke
The Five Doctors
1983

The pop songs that weren't

An Unearthly Child
  • The music on Susan’s radio, supposedly by John Smith and the Common Men, is nothing more than a stock track called ‘Three Guitars Mood 2’ by Nelson/Raymond, performed by The Arthur Nelson Group. But never fear: the track was hunted down and released on the Doctor Who album Space Adventures.
The Gunfighters
  • The song that runs throughout the story, performed by assorted characters and commenting on the action, was specially written for Doctor Who... and has yet to be commerically released, alas!
The War Machines: Episode 1
  • The pop music played in the background of the Inferno club, where Dodo and Polly spend much of the first episode cheering up Ben, meeting the Doctor and being seduced by WOTAN over the telephone, is all stock music, taken from the music library album ‘The Mood Modern’ (Keith Prowse KPM 1001), released in 1966. The tracks used were all by Jerry Hawksworth, and were titled:

    ‘Frantic Fracas/The Eyelash/Beat to Begin’ (2’47”)
    ‘Browbeater’ (0’43”)
    ‘Latin Gear’ (0’50”)
    ‘Rhythm n’Beat’ (1’00”)

    Quite why 'real' pop music wasn't used is anyone's guess; perhaps the production had been warned that using copyrighted music might lead to problems with international sales... or perhaps director Michael Ferguson just had a rubbish knowledge of contemporary music!
The Evil of the Daleks: Episode 1
  • The music on Bob Hall’s radio in the aircraft hanger is a stock track; the BBC production paperwork lists it as ‘Youngbeat’ by Jack Trombey, though this track does not actually match what is heard in the programme (see Space Adventures in the Stock Discography), and the track actually used may never be found again!
The Invasion: Episodes 1 - 3
  • The scenes in Vaughn's offices featured soothing background music that had actually been composed for the Out of the Uknown episode 'Time in Advance' in 1965, by BBC Radiophonic Workshop composer John Baker. The track (also featured in The Macra Terror) was released on CD in 2000 - details are in the Stock Discography.
The Green Death: Episode 6
  • The music at Jo and Cliff’s party – ‘It’ll Never Be Me’ - was recorded by riotous ‘60s band The Pretty Things under the alias of Electric Banana, taken from a stock music album that was not commercially available until 1991. More details are in the Stock Discography.
Enlightenment: Parts Three and Four
  • The music played during the party scenes on-board the The Buccaneer was ‘The Milgona’, and was recycled from a BBC Radio 3 documentary that had also been scored by Enlightenment's incidental music composer Malcolm Clarke. It was released on a non-Doctor Who-related record in 1983, shortly after Enlightenment's broadcast; so it's not exactly a pop track, nor a soundtrack release: after much deliberation we decided to put more details in the Stock section!
Remembrance of the Daleks: Part One
  • The rock music coming from Ace’s ghetto blaster in Part One was specially written by Keff McCulloch, and features on the isolated music soundtrack on the DVD release.
Silver Nemesis: Parts One and Two
  • The jazz enjoyed by the Doctor and Ace (both live and on cassette, jamming the Cybermen's transmissions) was specially composed and recorded by Courtney Pine’s jazz quartet at Lime Grove Music Studios on 12/06/88, 2 weeks before recording began for the serial. The tracks featured were ‘Pe Pi Po’ (01’00”) and ‘Adrian’s Affair’ (0’08”) in Part One, and ‘Frank’s Quest’ (0’06”, 0’25” and 0’04”) in Part Two. All four musicians – Courtney Pine (Saxophone), Adrian Reid (Piano), Ernest Mothle (Double Bass) and Frank Tontoh (Drums) – received on screen credits at the end of the episode. None of the tracks have been recorded for commercial release, though sheet music for each appears to have been available from MCS Music (see http://www.enjamusic.com).
Doctor Who – The Movie
  • The song playing on the TARDIS gramophone is ‘In a Dream’ performed by Pat Hodge; the country music in the background at the mortuary is ‘All Dressed Up’; and the rock music playing at the New Year’s Eve party is ‘Ride into the Moonlight’. All three tracks were taken from non-commercial library albums, and were included in full as bonus audio tracks on the BBC DVD release of the film. More details are in the Stock Discography.
The Christmas Invasion
  • The song that plays over the final few scenes – as the tenth Doctor finds his new clothes and the Tylers have Christmas dinner – was ‘Song for Ten’, composed by Murray Gold and sung by Tim Phillips as a last-minute replacement for a genuine American pop record that copyright could not be obtained for. A 30-second sample of the track was made available at BBC Online several weeks after transmission; the song was extended and sung by the Divine Comedy's Neil Hannon for a December 2006 CD release; and, on the same day, the full-length Tim Phillips version was behind door number 4 of BBC Online's Doctor Who Advent Calender (as a realplayer streaming file). A live version performed by the BBC National Orchestra of Wales, sung by Gary Williams, formed part of the November 2006 Children in Need concert of Murray Gold's Doctor Who music; this was broadcast (and hence, in theory, bootleggeable) by BBC Radio Wales, BBC One (as part of Doctor Who Confidential) and the digital ‘red button’ broadcast of the concert that followed The Runaway Bride.

Doctor Who's own cover-versions

Delta and the Bannermen
  • This story is jam-packed with authentic ‘50s music – yet absolutely none of it was by the original artists, or even commercially released cover versions. Incidental music composer Keff McCulloch recorded his own versions for use in the programme, using extra musicians and singers who actually appeared on-screen in Part One, miming to their own recordings (that's Keff McCulloch over Billy's right shoulder as he sings 'Why Do Fools...?').

    This group - nicknamed The Lorrells – performed the following:
    Part One: ‘Rock Around the Clock’ (Max Freedman & Jimmy de Night)
    ‘Singing the Blues’ (Melvin Endsleigh)
    ‘Why Do Fools Fall in Love’ (Frank Lyman & George Goldner)
    ‘Mr Sandman’ (Pat Ballard)
    Part Two: ‘Goodnight Sweetheart’ (Noble)
    Part Three: ‘That’ll Be The Day’ (Buddy Holly & Norman Petty)
    'Only You’ (Buck Ram & Ande Rand)
    ‘Lollipop, Lollipop, Oh Lollipop’ (Beverley Ross & Julius Dixon)
    ‘Who’s Sorry Now’ (Bert Kalmer, Harry Ruby & Ted Snyder)
    ‘Happy Days Are Here Again’ (Jack Yellen & Milton Ager)

    Keff McCulloch also integrated the following into his incidental music:
    ‘Calling All Workers’ (Eric Coates), ‘Children’s Favourites’ (White), ‘The Parade of the Tin Soldiers’ (Jessel) and ‘In Party Mood’ (Jack Strachey) in Part One and ‘Devil’s Gallop’ (Charles Williams) in Part Two.

    His incidental score also included vocals and pop-sounding tunes, such as the closing track ‘Here’s to the Future’ – these, however, were entirely McCulloch’s own work.
Remembrance of the Daleks
  • The café featured throughout the story played contemporary music from a jukebox or radio. Some of these were the original recordings (see above), though McCulloch recorded new versions of both ‘Return to Sender’ (Otis Blackwell & Winfield Scott) in Part One, with Keith Murrell, and ‘Apache’ (Jerry Lordan) in Part Three. The television set in Part Two emitted a blast of ‘Children’s Favourites’ (White), which was also performed by McCulloch.
Ghost Light: Part One
  • Gwendoline performs ‘That’s the Way to the Zoo’ with Alasdair Nicolson off-screen on piano, composed by J. F. Mitchell c.1883.
The Empty Child
  • As the Doctor enters the nightclub, a lounge singer and band are performing ‘It Had to Be You’; this was specially recorded for use in the programme.
Love & Monsters
  • The songs sung by Bliss (on her acoustic guitar) were the traditional fifteenth century ‘The Riddle’, recorded in 1976 by Greek singer Nana Mouskouri as ‘I Gave My Love a Cherry’, and ‘Brand New Key’, a January 1972 hit for American singer-songwriter Melanie Safka. LINDA famously performed their own rendition of the ELO classic, ‘Don’t Bring Me Down’, from September 1979. The backing track was recorded by incidental musician Murray Gold and the vocals were sung (at a later dubbing session) by the actors themselves.